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Dacia Lodgy safety test rated worst of 2012

Dacia Lodgy safety test rated worst of 2012
Tristan Honeywill

Renault Group’s Dacia Lodgy has produced the lowest Euro NCAP safety rating for a 2012 European car. The Lodgy’s results come just a week after the Sandero, branded a Renault in South America, was given a poor one-star review by Latin NCAP. Renault seems to be relying on people not sharing information about its cars’ safety.

Like the Sandero, the Lodgy is a budget vehicle designed to attract drivers who usually buy second hand. The assumption seems to be that these are people who will accept compromises on safety, who place greater value on performance or comfort.

I doubt many would knowingly compromise as much as Dacia has chosen to. We fly with budget airlines because we know they save money on the seats and hospitality, not the aircraft.

It’s wrong to think a three-star safety rating is acceptable, even for a cheap car. The way NCAP’s scheme focuses on producing an overall rating means a car must be really, really bad to score two stars.

The crash test report sounds horrendous: “The rear passenger floor panel and tunnel were completely separated, extending into the driver’s footwell and the transmission tunnel was deformed between the front seats.”

In 2012, it’s extraordinary for a car’s floor to split in this way.

Euro NCAP secretary-general told Car Safety Rules: “It’s strange that Renault allows this to happen. The car breaks open – this is a serious fault that we haven’t seen for some time. It’s quite disturbing.”

Van Ratingen continues: “There’s nothing good. Everything about this car is below-average. It worries me that this is being marketed as a family car and that some organisations have already named it their car of the year. It has one of the worst adult occupation protection and one of the worst child occupant protection scores.”

Dacia also charges €300 for electronic stability control (ESC), a technology that has been a legal requirement for new cars in Europe since late last year. The Lodgy must have been type-approved just before the new rule came into force. Is that a clever cost-saving or just poor customer service


“There’s nothing good. Everything about this car is below-average. It worries me that this is being marketed as a family car.”

Head of Euro NCAP, Michiel van Ratingen

In 2004, the Renault Modus made history as the first supermini-sized car to earn a full five-star rating. It would be brilliant if the Dacia Lodgy shared the ambitions of the Modus, not just its now-outdated platform. A budget MPV with five stars would be a more attractive offer to many parents. The Lodgy is one car where it makes sense to share Euro NCAP’s concerns with friends.

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